New College's Diversity Statement

New College educates intellectually curious students for lives of great achievement in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community characterized by openness, kindness, and mutual respect. The college fosters a climate in which individuals of all religions, all races, all ethnicities, all abilities, all gender expressions, all sexual orientations, all political and economic backgrounds, and every heritage contribute and are welcome.

Diversity Statement

New College educates intellectually curious students for lives of great achievement in a diverse, inclusive and vibrant community characterized by openness, kindness, and mutual respect. The college fosters a climate in which individuals of all religions, all races, all ethnicities, all abilities, all gender expressions, all sexual orientations, all political and economic backgrounds, and every heritage contribute and are welcome.

Campus Resources

  • Gender and Diversity Center
  • Diversity Committee
  • Student Affairs
  • Cross College Alliance resources?

Student Groups

  • Asian Pacific Islander Student Alliance
  • Black Student Union
  • Catholic Solidarity
  • German Club
  • Hillel
  • LatinX Club
  • Middle East Interest Club
  • Queery
  • Seeds of Hope
  • Trans Party

Sarasota & bradenton resourceS

Courses

  • Andean Prehistory
  • Chinese History to 1800
  • Classical Chinese Philosophy
  • Critical Race Theory
  • Cultures of the Contemporary USA
  • Dances in Many Spaces
  • Development Economics
  • Ecological Anthropology
  • Economics of Race, Gender and Discrimination
  • Ethnography: Theory and Practice
  • Existentialist Themes
  • Feminist, Queer and Trans Theory
  • From Painted Women to Mad Men: Consumerism and Spectacle in American History
  • Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights
  • History of Anthropological Theory
  • Introduction to Buddhism
  • Introduction to Caribbean and Latin American Studies
  • Introduction to Gender Studies
  • Introduction to Islam
  • Introduction to Performance Studies
  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Introduction to the Study of Religion
  • Lecturas Hispanicas
  • Migration and Memory: New Pathways in World Literature
  • Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
  • Performing Gender, Class and Identity in Early Modern Drama
  • Popular Music and Societies of the Hispanic Caribbean
  • Psychology of Religion
  • Public Health Disparities
  • Renaissance and Reformation Europe
  • Ritual Theory
  • Sex, Lies and Damnation: Pope Gregory VII and Emperor Henry IV
  • Survey of Archaeology
  • Terror and Fiction: British, American and World Literature
  • Understanding Poetry
  • Unihabitable Worlds
  • Urban Dance I
  • U.S. – Japan Relations of the 20th Century
  • World Economic History
  • Women and Gender in China
  • Women Breaking the Rules: American Literature and Film
  • Writing the Self: Autobiography, Testimony and Biography

History of Diversity

1959

The Board of Home Missions (BHM) of the Congregational and Christian Churches (later renamed the United Church of Christ) provided the initial funding to establish a four-year liberal arts college in Sarasota. The church stipulated that the “college shall be open to all students qualified for its academic program. Race, creed, national origin, or cultural status shall not be considered as a basis for denial of admission.” No other Florida college or university, public or private, had an open admissions policy. The church’s funding was also contingent upon the college agreeing that its board of trustees would be open to the nomination of black trustees. The college’s founders also stipulated: “The college is not just tolerant of all faiths; it expects proponents of various beliefs to be mutually respectful and willing to open their faith to the community.”

1962

Several new members of the board are elected, including Alberto Gainza Paz, editor and publisher of the newspaper La Prensain Buenos Aires.

1963

New College chooses I.M. Pei to be the college’s architect.

1965

New College students Sarah Dean, Rachel Findley, and Gordon Jarrell go to Alabama to join the Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march. During the march, the three students are jailed and charged with refusing to obey an officer.

1966?

Mary Elmendorf, wife of President Elmendorf, arranges for students to go to Guatemala for their independent study periods in January. It began a long and fruitful series of off-campus student experiences that would begin in Central and South America and spread to all parts of the world.

1970

During a local boycott by black students protesting a school board decision to close schools in the black community, students leapt at the chance to teach in the “Freedom Schools” set up in the week-long action.

Twenty-two women students, who came to be known as the South Hall Twenty-Two, presented a list of demands to the college president, including adding a woman gynecologist to the college health services, providing abortion referrals, and supplying free contraceptives. When the president did not meet all of their demands, they staged a sit-in in his office. A court injunction and lack of support from the campus community ended the sit-in several days later.